Strength testing of the human olfactory nerve at the frontal skull base.

23:39 EDT 1st July 2015 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Strength testing of the human olfactory nerve at the frontal skull base."

Olfactory dysfunction may influence the quality of life tremendously. This study investigated the strength of the human olfactory nerve at the frontal skull base using cadavers. A total of 180 olfactory nerves were examined in 90 human cadaveric heads. The cut edges of the olfactory nerves were pulled until they were pulled out from the skull base. In the first set of 30 cases, each right olfactory nerve was pulled 0° laterally and 0° upward, and each left olfactory nerve was pulled 0° laterally and 15° upward. In the second set of 30 cases, each right olfactory nerve was pulled 0° laterally and 15° upward, and each left olfactory nerve was pulled 15° laterally and 15° upward. In the third set of 30 cases, each right olfactory nerve was pulled 15° laterally and 15° upward, and each left olfactory nerve was pulled 30° laterally and 15° upward. The strength of the olfactory nerve was measured when pulled in each direction. There was no significant difference in the strength of the olfactory nerves when pulling them in the postero-upward direction between 0° and 15° upward. The strengths of the olfactory nerves when pulling them in the postero-lateral direction 0° and 15° laterally were 3.14±1.87 and 4.05±1.70 g (mean ± standard deviation [SD]), respectively; the difference was almost significant. The olfactory nerve could be pulled more laterally than posteriorly because the retraction force is absorbed by the lateral wall of the olfactory fossa.

Affiliation

Department of Neurosurgery, Southern Tohoku General Hospital, 2-5 Satonomori Iwanuma, Miyagi, 989-2483, Japan, masatotomii@ybb.ne.jp.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Neurosurgical review
ISSN: 1437-2320
Pages:

Links

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.

Ovoid body resting on the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone where the olfactory nerve terminates. The olfactory bulb contains several types of nerve cells including the mitral cells, on whose dendrites the olfactory nerve synapses, forming the olfactory glomeruli. The accessory olfactory bulb, which receives the projection from the VOMERONASAL ORGAN via the vomeronasal nerve, is also included here.

Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; olfactory tract, olfactory tubercle, anterior perforated substance, and olfactory cortex. The term rhinencephalon is restricted to structures in the CNS receiving fibers from the olfactory bulb.

Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).

Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.


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